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Brian Lowery

Brian   Lowery
Professor, Organizational Behavior
Brian Lowery
Professor of Organizational Behavior
Academic Area: 
Organizational Behavior

Research Statement

Professor Lowery's research seeks to extend knowledge of individuals' experience of inequality and fairness. His work suggests that individuals distinguish between inequalities framed as advantage as opposed to disadvantage. This finding affects how individuals perceive inequality and the steps they take, if any, to reduce it. Thus, his work sheds light on intergroup conflict and the nature of social justice.

Bio

Brian Lowery is a Professor of Organizational Behavior. Professor Lowery is a social psychologist by training. He received his doctorate from UCLA in 2001 with a minor in statistical methods.

Professor Lowery’s research has two major threads. The first thread examines the operation of racial attitudes below the threshold of consciousness. The second thread focuses on how people perceive inequality. Underlying both lines of work is the assumption that individuals may unintentionally exacerbate existing inequity, despite supporting the ideal of a just and fair society. This research has been published in major scholarly journals such as the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, and Law and Human Behavior.

Professor Lowery’s teaching focuses on translating basic knowledge about human interactions into lessons for managers. He currently teaches introductory organizational behavior courses for both master’s and doctorate level students. In addition, he teaches a seminar on managing diversity.

Professor Lowery is in charge of the Lowery Lab. The lab focuses on how individuals perceive inequality. At the most basic level we seek to extend knowledge of individuals’ experience of inequality and fairness. As such, our work touches on concerns of researchers across a range of social psychological literatures. In addition to connections with theories of equity, this work touches on issues of intergroup conflict and social justice. The extant literature generally assumes that individuals focus on their relative position in social hierarchies. In contrast, we suggest that individuals judge their and others’ positions relative to some standard. Thus, we posit that individuals distinguish between inequalities framed as advantage as opposed to disadvantage.

Academic Degrees

  • PhD, University of California, Los Angeles, 2002
  • MA, University of California, Los Angeles, 1998
  • BS, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, 1996

Academic Appointments

  • At Stanford University since 2002

Publications

Journal Articles

Brian Lowery, Daryl A. Wout. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. June 2010, Vol. 98, Issue 6, Pages 956-966.
Eric D. Knowles, Brian Lowery, Rebecca L Schaumberg. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. March 2010, Vol. 46, Issue 2, Pages 420–423.
Eric D. Knowles, Brian Lowery, Caitlin M. Hogan, Rosalind M. Chow. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2009, Vol. 96, Issue 4, Pages 857-869.
Brian Lowery, Rosalind M. Chow, Jennifer Randall Crosby. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 2009, Vol. 45, Issue 2, Pages 375-378.
Miguel M. Unzueta, Brian Lowery, Eric D. Knowles. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. January 2008, Vol. 105, Issue 1, Pages 1–13.
Rosalind M. Chow, Brian Lowery, Eric D. Knowles. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2008, Vol. 44, Issue 4, Pages 1073–1081.
Brian Lowery, Miguel M. Unzueta, Eric D. Knowles, Phillip Atiba Goff. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. June 2006, Vol. 90, Issue 6, Pages :961-74.
Brian Lowery, Miguel M. Unzueta , Eric D. Knowles, Phillip Atiba Goff . Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2006, Vol. 90, Issue 6, Pages 961-974.
Stacey Sinclair, Brian Lowery, Curtis D. Hardin, A. Colangelo . Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2005, Vol. 89, Issue 4, Pages 583-592.

Working Papers

Long-term Effects of Subliminal Priming on Academic Performance | PDF
Brian Lowery, Naomi Eisenberger , Curtis Hardin, Stacey Sinclair2006

Courses Taught

Degree Courses

2014-15

This course introduces you to the structures and processes that affect group performance and highlights some of the common pitfalls associated with working in teams. Topics include team culture, fostering creativity and coordination, making group...

Over the last few years there has been a number of popular books proclaiming a seismic shift in the role that men and women play or will play in society. Perhaps the most hyperbolic representation of this line of thinking is the book titled ¿The...

2013-14

The Critical Analytical Thinking (CAT) course provides a setting for students to further develop and hone the skills needed to analyze complex issues and make forceful and well-grounded arguments. In 16-18 person sections, you will analyze,...

2012-13

The Critical Analytical Thinking (CAT) course provides a setting for students to further develop and hone the skills needed to analyze complex issues and make forceful and well-grounded arguments. In 16-18 person sections, you will analyze,...

This course introduces you to the structures and processes that affect group performance and highlights some of the common pitfalls associated with working in teams. Topics include team culture, fostering creativity and coordination, making group...

2011-12

This course introduces you to the structures and processes that affect group performance and highlights some of the common pitfalls associated with working in teams. Topics include team culture, fostering creativity and coordination, making group...

2010-11

Critical Analytical Thinking (CAT) will address issues that transcend any single discipline or function of management. In 14-16 person sections, you will analyze, write about, and debate fundamental issues, questions, and phenomena that arise in...

This course introduces you to the structures and processes that affect group performance and highlights some of the common pitfalls associated with working in teams. Topics include team culture, fostering creativity and coordination, making group...

Service to the Profession

Member

  • American Psychological Society
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology
  • Academy of Management
  • Society of Experimental Social Psychology