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John-Paul Ferguson

John-Paul   Ferguson
Assistant Professor, Organizational Behavior
Contact Info
John-PaulFerguson
Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior
Shanahan Family Faculty Scholar for 2016-2017
Academic Area: 
Organizational Behavior

Research Statement

Professor Ferguson's research focuses on the dynamics of bureaucracy and careers in organizations. He concentrates on the ways that formal rules and structures affect managers' decisions and shape both workers' careers and organizational change. His work examines for example the costs and benefits for workers of getting specialized rather than diverse career experience; the ways that task interdependence and career mobility shape job redesign; and whether formalized employment policies reduce employment segregation.

Research Interests

  • Employment segregation
  • Bureaucracy
  • Careers
  • Hiring practices
  • Labor unions

Bio

Professor Ferguson is a mutt who spent equal parts of his childhood in New Jersey and Texas. This was useful, because the two accents cancel one another out perfectly. Prior to academia, he spent time in international development, working for the U.S. State Department, the ILO, and the World Bank. Professor Ferguson’s waistline obscures a passionate interest in cycling; in his spare time he volunteers as a mechanic in San Francisco, helping people to build, maintain and repair their bikes. 

Academic Degrees

  • PhD in Management, MIT Sloan School of Management, 2009
  • MA in International Relations, Johns Hopkins University SAIS, 2001
  • BA in Political Science, University of Oklahoma, 1999
  • BA in History, University of Oklahoma, 1999

Academic Appointments

  • At Stanford University since 2009

Publications

Journal Articles

John-Paul Ferguson. ILR Review. January 2016, Vol. 69, Issue 1, Pages 53–83.
John-Paul Ferguson. American Journal of Sociology. November 2015, Vol. 121, Issue 3, Pages 675-721.
Sharique Hasan, John-Paul Ferguson, Rembrand Koning. Organization Science. October 2015, Vol. 26, Issue 6, Pages 1665-1681.
John-Paul Ferguson, Sharique Hasan. Administrative Science Quarterly. 2013, Vol. 58, Issue 2, Pages 233-256.
John-Paul Ferguson. Industrial Relations Review. October 2008, Vol. 62, Issue 1, Pages 3-21.
Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, Thomas Kochan, John-Paul Ferguson, Betty Barret. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1571-9979.2007.00142.x/abstract. July 2007, Vol. 23, Issue 3, Pages 249-265.
William A. Douglas, John-Paul Ferguson, Erin Klett. Human Rights Quarterly. May 2004, Vol. 26, Issue 2, Pages 273-299.

Working Papers

Teaching

Degree Courses

2016-17

This course examines fundamental issues of general management and leadership within an organization. You will learn about setting an organization's strategic direction, aligning structure to implement strategy, and leading individuals within the...

2015-16

This pro-seminar is primarily for OB-macro PhD students who are developing dissertation ideas. The focus is on the theoretical argument underpinning the dissertation research. Students will regularly present and comment upon one another's ideas....

This course examines fundamental issues of general management and leadership within an organization. You will learn about setting an organization's strategic direction, aligning structure to implement strategy, and leading individuals within the...

2014-15

This course examines fundamental issues of general management and leadership within an organization. You will learn about setting an organization's strategic direction, aligning structure to implement strategy, and leading individuals within the...

Executive Education & Other Non-Degree Programs

Stanford Case Studies

Blue Skies: Connecting African Farmers to Global Markets | IDE08
John-Paul Ferguson, Laurent De Clara2014

Insights by Stanford Business

June 27, 2016
Research shows reducing discrimination is harder than we thought.
September 23, 2013
Stanford scholars explore how the path you take affects your career prospects.

School News

June 13, 2015
Annual teaching awards honor exemplary contributions and student impact.