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Insights by Stanford Business

Insights

Customers at a bank | Reuters/Paul Hackett
March 24, 2015
Written

Back to the Future: Do Banks Really Learn from Long-term Relationships?

A pair of economists examine whether banks acquire any special wisdom from repeat borrowers.

Insights

Planning, Presenting, Practice
March 2, 2015
Written

Matt Abrahams: Tips and Techniques for More Confident and Compelling Presentations

A Stanford lecturer explains key ways you can better plan, practice, and present your next talk.

Insights

A trader plays a computer game in the trading room of the Shanghai Petroleum Exchange. | Reuters/Aly Song
March 18, 2015
Written

How a Bit of Play Might Lead to Better Work

The CEO of Badgeville says companies that “gamify” their workplaces could see more engagement and productivity.

Insights

Jeffrey Pfeffer
March 19, 2015
Video

Jeffrey Pfeffer: Power (and How to Get More of It)

A professor of organizational behavior describes how you can increase your influence at work.

Insights

The U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise in Washington March 1, 2013. The best government programs are flexible yet predictable. | Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
March 18, 2015
Written

Renee Bowen: How a Twist to Mandatory Spending Could Reduce Gridlock

A Stanford economist shows how warring political parties could get better results by building some flexibility into mandatory spending programs.

Insights

Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
March 17, 2015
Written

Neil Malhotra: Debunking the Myth of the Liberal Supreme Court

A political economist looks at the relationship between public opinion and the high court.

Insights

Walmart CEO Doug McMillon | Natalie White
March 23, 2015
Written

Walmart CEO: Waiting for Consensus “Can Kill You”

Head of world’s largest company discusses making decisions and knowing when to admit failure.

Insights

A woman walking out of Google
February 26, 2015
Written

Lisa De Simone: How U.S. Companies Export Profits to Save on Taxes

A Stanford scholar examines three methods of income shifting, and why some firms benefit more than others.

Insights

A man holding his hands over his face
February 23, 2015
Written

Why Your Workplace Might Be Killing You

Stanford scholars identify 10 work stressors that are destroying your health.

Latest Stories

October 7, 2014
Written

An Entrepreneur and His Wife Row 2,800 Miles Across the Pacific

For a cofounder of Trulia, a seemingly hazardous adventure was good for mind, body, and business.
October 7, 2014
Written

Introducing Insights by Stanford Business

Welcome to the new digital home for research, stories, and ideas from Stanford Graduate School of Business.
October 6, 2014
Written

Nicholas Bloom: Decentralized Firms are More Recession-Proof

Research shows that flexibility wins in bad economic times.
October 2, 2014
Written

William Barnett: When Being a Nonconformist Entrepreneur Pays Off

A study finds that bucking the trend can lead to entrepreneurial success.
September 30, 2014
Written

Kathryn Shaw: Entrepreneurship Requires Practice, Practice, Practice

A scholar finds that repeat entrepreneurs are more likely to succeed.
September 24, 2014
Written

Former BP CEO John Browne: Why Coming Out is Good Business

In an excerpt from his new book, a former oil executive explains why he kept his gay identity a secret for decades.
September 23, 2014
Written

Rebecca Diamond: What Is the Relationship Between Economics and Geography?

Research explores the interplay between wages, taxes, housing costs, the movement of workers, and education.
September 21, 2014
Bloomberg West TV
Stanford Graduate School of Business accounting professor Charles Lee analyzes the Alibaba IPO and how it could affect the Chinese economy.
September 19, 2014
Stanford GSB on Tumblr
Eighty-five percent of people struggle with speaking in front of others. Stanford GSB Lecturer Matt Abrahams provides five tips to thrive in any speaking situation.
September 19, 2014
Written

Roderick Kramer: How Do Trustworthy Leaders Behave?

A scholar explains some signs that a boss has your — and the organization’s — best interests at heart.