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Insights by Stanford Business

Insights

Customers at a bank | Reuters/Paul Hackett
March 24, 2015
Written

Back to the Future: Do Banks Really Learn from Long-term Relationships?

A pair of economists examine whether banks acquire any special wisdom from repeat borrowers.

Insights

Planning, Presenting, Practice
March 2, 2015
Written

Matt Abrahams: Tips and Techniques for More Confident and Compelling Presentations

A Stanford lecturer explains key ways you can better plan, practice, and present your next talk.

Insights

A trader plays a computer game in the trading room of the Shanghai Petroleum Exchange. | Reuters/Aly Song
March 18, 2015
Written

How a Bit of Play Might Lead to Better Work

The CEO of Badgeville says companies that “gamify” their workplaces could see more engagement and productivity.

Insights

Jeffrey Pfeffer
March 19, 2015
Video

Jeffrey Pfeffer: Power (and How to Get More of It)

A professor of organizational behavior describes how you can increase your influence at work.

Insights

The U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise in Washington March 1, 2013. The best government programs are flexible yet predictable. | Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
March 18, 2015
Written

Renee Bowen: How a Twist to Mandatory Spending Could Reduce Gridlock

A Stanford economist shows how warring political parties could get better results by building some flexibility into mandatory spending programs.

Insights

Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
March 17, 2015
Written

Neil Malhotra: Debunking the Myth of the Liberal Supreme Court

A political economist looks at the relationship between public opinion and the high court.

Insights

Walmart CEO Doug McMillon | Natalie White
March 23, 2015
Written

Walmart CEO: Waiting for Consensus “Can Kill You”

Head of world’s largest company discusses making decisions and knowing when to admit failure.

Insights

A woman walking out of Google
February 26, 2015
Written

Lisa De Simone: How U.S. Companies Export Profits to Save on Taxes

A Stanford scholar examines three methods of income shifting, and why some firms benefit more than others.

Insights

A man holding his hands over his face
February 23, 2015
Written

Why Your Workplace Might Be Killing You

Stanford scholars identify 10 work stressors that are destroying your health.

Latest Stories

October 1, 2011
Written

Chid Liberty: Building Fair-Trade Manufacturing in Liberia

An entrepreneur explains how it's possible to make money and do good at the same time.
October 1, 2011
Written

Who Is More Digital? Teenagers in China or Silicon Valley?

High school students in Palo Alto spend more time using digital media daily than their counterparts in Beijing, according to a Stanford study.
September 15, 2011
Written

Give Them the Gift They're Expecting

Research shows that when it comes to gift giving, most people are simply not paying enough attention to what others want.
September 15, 2011
Written

Investor Flows Were Behind the 2008 Oil Price Wild Ride

Research says there was an "economically and statistically significant effect of investor flows on futures prices."
September 15, 2011
Written

When They Are Wrong, Analysts May Dig in Their Heels

Analysts sometimes stick to their erroneous views, a tendency that might contribute to market bubbles and busts.
September 12, 2011
Written

Matt Ivester: Why Bad Behavior Online Can Ruin Your Life

In his new book, a Stanford MBA student offers a prescription for students who want to enter the adult world with their reputations intact.
September 1, 2011
Written

Eliminating Sales Quotas May Stimulate Profits

A professor of marketing says eliminating sales quotas boosts company profits.
September 1, 2011
Written

Jack Ma: China's Alibaba Wants to Acquire Yahoo

The Chinese internet giant chairman shows how, in many ways, China's internet has eclipsed that of the United States.
July 1, 2011
Written

Why a Ferrari May Make Imported Wine Seem Expensive

A professor of marketing says consumers equate "foreign" with "expensive."
June 25, 2011
Written

Trends in Tech-Savvy Education

Virtual classrooms, data analysis, and other cutting-edge tools are replacing "chalk and talk" to help educators improve worldwide education levels.