North America

Hands exchanging a dollar bill
January 6, 2014
New research by Stanford GSB Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer shows that the more money we earn, the more money we want.
photo of lab tech making solar panel
June 6, 2012
A conversation with Stefan Reichelstein on the economics of solar power.
Charles Lee faculty award photo
June 4, 2012
Stanford GSB students honor Dirk Jenter, Charles Lee, and Jeremy Bulow for their memorable teaching.
New York Times -
June 1, 2012
Writing in the New York Times, researchers at Stanford’s Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance urge Congress to reduce the financing costs of renewable energy by granting tax breaks now available to non-renewables.
Image of chinese father and child waiting for health care
May 2, 2012
Serial entrepreneur Kewen Jin discusses the rapid growth of China's health care industry and the idea of "innovation by subtraction."
January 28, 2012
Sustainability now also means treating farmworkers well, an avocado grower tells MBA students interested in food and agriculture resource management.
Kenneth W. Shotts
October 9, 2011
Elections sometimes give policy makers incentives to pander to implement policies that voters think are in their best interest even though the policy maker knows they are not, says Professor Kenneth Shotts. In general, an effective media reduces this tendency to pander, "but there are some exceptions to this general rule."
October 1, 2011
High School students in Palo Alto, Calif., spend more time using digital media daily than their counterparts in Beijing, but the Chinese youths are more likely to build networks online only according to a new study from Stanford University.
Kenneth Singleton
September 15, 2011
The 2008 turmoil in world oil prices was not caused by an imbalance of supply and demand, argues Professor Kenneth Singleton of the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Instead there was an "economically and statistically significant effect of investor flows on futures prices."
June 22, 2011
"If you don't have a high school education in America, you are chained to limited options," Cory Booker, mayor of Newark, N.J., told the Goldman Sachs/Stanford University Global Education Conference.
photo of lab tech making solar panel
June 6, 2012
A conversation with Stefan Reichelstein on the economics of solar power.
Charles Lee faculty award photo
June 4, 2012
Stanford GSB students honor Dirk Jenter, Charles Lee, and Jeremy Bulow for their memorable teaching.
Image of chinese father and child waiting for health care
May 2, 2012
Serial entrepreneur Kewen Jin discusses the rapid growth of China's health care industry and the idea of "innovation by subtraction."
January 28, 2012
Sustainability now also means treating farmworkers well, an avocado grower tells MBA students interested in food and agriculture resource management.
October 1, 2011
High School students in Palo Alto, Calif., spend more time using digital media daily than their counterparts in Beijing, but the Chinese youths are more likely to build networks online only according to a new study from Stanford University.
June 22, 2011
"If you don't have a high school education in America, you are chained to limited options," Cory Booker, mayor of Newark, N.J., told the Goldman Sachs/Stanford University Global Education Conference.
April 1, 2011
Streamlining balky government permit processes or convoluted global supply chains are just some of the challenges in the "Valley of Death" faced by fledgling clean energy firms, government officials were told during a Stanford forum.
April 1, 2011
Calling education "the most important problem that we have to solve in this country," an official of the U.S. Department of Education warned that other nations are doing a better job than the United States of educating their young people.
March 1, 2011
The Stanford Graduate School of Business has confirmed finance services industry leader and public servant Herb Allison as alumni speaker at its 2011 graduation ceremony on June 11. As the U.S. Assistant Secretary for Financial Stability and Counselor to the Secretary of the Treasury, Allison supervised the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) until stepping down last September. The...
Hands exchanging a dollar bill
January 6, 2014
New research by Stanford GSB Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer shows that the more money we earn, the more money we want.
Kenneth W. Shotts
October 9, 2011
Elections sometimes give policy makers incentives to pander to implement policies that voters think are in their best interest even though the policy maker knows they are not, says Professor Kenneth Shotts. In general, an effective media reduces this tendency to pander, "but there are some exceptions to this general rule."
Kenneth Singleton
September 15, 2011
The 2008 turmoil in world oil prices was not caused by an imbalance of supply and demand, argues Professor Kenneth Singleton of the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Instead there was an "economically and statistically significant effect of investor flows on futures prices."
June 1, 2011
Policy makers need to understand how early-stage companies in their own area work, rather than try to create another Silicon Valley, says Stanford management professor George Foster. He is coauthor of a new report published by the World Economic Forum.
January 20, 2011
Text of Op-Ed Published in Financial Times
October 1, 2010
Medical Technologies with high "social value" can play an important role in helping safety-net providers use their resources more efficiently. However, traditional investors often see the total market potential for such technologies small relative to other, more immediate opportunities, leaving many companies struggling to secure capital, say researchers Stefanos Zenios and Lyn Denend.
September 8, 2010
Stanford experts have concluded that in the event of a nuclear detonation, people in large metropolitan areas are better off sheltering-in-place in basements for 12-24 hours than trying to evacuate immediately, unless a lengthy warning period is provided.
September 1, 2010
(This paper has sparked discussion. View other material related to this topic)
May 1, 2010
The United States will see a slow move toward electric car adoption in the next 5-to-10 years while China will see only a small market for cars but big opportunities to manufacture and export batteries. A Stanford MBA student class study doubts either nation will move quickly to adopt clean coal technology.