Leadership

Professor Sarah Soule
When she was in graduate school in the early 1990s, Sarah Soule joked with fellow students that it took longer to publish a research paper than to gestate a human baby. From the time a research paper was submitted to a peer-reviewed journal until it was published, a year or more passed. The...
A group of students talking and laughing
Conventional wisdom holds that gossip and social exclusion are always malicious, undermining trust and morale in groups. But that is not always true, according to a new study published in the journal Psychological Science. Robb Willer, an associate professor of sociology, explored the nature of...
U.S. Social Security checks
To fiscal hawks, and some political centrists, “mandatory’’ entitlement programs such as Medicare and Social Security are at the heart of unsustainable, out-of-control federal spending. Mandatory programs, unlike “discretionary” programs, continue year after year and essentially run on autopilot...
Four men meeting around a computer
For nearly his entire life, Peter Georgescu has been obsessed with the struggle of good versus evil in human nature. “Why is it possible for people, most of whom can also be loving and compassionate, to do terrible things?” wonders Georgescu, author of The Constant Choice: An Everyday Journey from...
Maeve L.J. Richard
Maeve L.J. Richard, MBA ’84, has been named assistant dean and director of the Career Management Center at Stanford Graduate School of Business. A career advisor since July 2013, Richard came to Stanford following a career in finance at large and small for profit and nonprofit companies in a...
Students meeting
Power is my mistress. I have worked too hard at her conquest to allow anyone to take her away from me. Napoleon Bonaparte, 1804 Research over the past two decades has established the panoptic effect of power on people. Put simply: Power changes people. People who rise to the tops of companies and...

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