Leadership

STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—It's almost axiomatic that business is a Darwinian struggle. But what that means is far from clear. Do businesses, like living creatures, survive because they learn to adapt to a changing environment? Or, like dinosaurs, are they unable to change and thus die...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—In a business environment where heads of companies are increasingly held accountable for performance and boards are willing to use their muscle to push them out, CEOs are being handed pink slips more frequently than ever before. So what does that mean for the...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—The fall of WorldCom, Enron, and Arthur Andersen, and the public humiliation of Kenneth Lay, Dennis Kozlowski, and Richard Grasso have caused the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, prompted the New York Stock Exchange to create new corporate governance...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—Human resource executives say that diversity in the workplace can have a number of benefits, including improved understanding of the marketplace, enhanced creativity and problem-solving ability in teams, and better use of talent. But social science research is...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—You may have called it a "team" or a "study group" or nothing at all. You may have been at work or at play, or even at war. But if you've ever belonged to a "hot group," chances are you'll remember it, by any name, as one of the most creative and productive...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—Most business executives in the United States believe strongly in the virtues of competition, not only between organizations but within them as well. Competition fits the cultural emphasis on individualism in the United States, where a social Darwinist...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—People vote for candidates based on their performance in office — right? While political scientists like to think so, new research argues that a political incumbent's fate can be influenced by far less weighty matters — like whether the local college football...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—Venture capitalists and other investors routinely gamble on which start-up companies warrant their investment. Complex models and detailed algorithms can be used to evaluate an organization's financial position, market potential, and level of quantifiable risk...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS —In 2001, when Hewlett-Packard’s then-CEO Carly Fiorina announced that the technology giant proposed to merge with Compaq Computer Corp., she set off a firestorm of controversy. Michael Dell, CEO of rival Dell Computer, famously called it “the dumbest deal of...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS — Open source software — where the source code for programs, such as the Linux kernel and popular applications provided by Red Hat and similar software companies is freely available — has become a major and fast-growing presence in recent years. New research...

Pages