Marketing Sales

STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—Emotions can get in the way of making prudent financial decisions. Thus concludes a study by a Stanford marketing professor that found that people with certain kinds of brain injuries earned more money investing than a comparison group. The study was conducted...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—’Tis the season, and if you’re like most people you’ll probably end up dropping a heftier sum of cash than you’re comfortable with on presents for loved ones and colleagues. The findings of a recent study, however, might encourage you to think twice about what...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS — Product creators whose offerings or expertise are more clearly associated with one or two product categories have better sales than those whose goods or professional identity span multiple categories, according to a recently-published study. The more focused...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—The drugs your physician prescribes may well depend on the behavior of an opinion leader in his or her social network in addition to your doctor's own knowledge of or familiarity with those products. Pharmaceutical firms, pay attention. Marketing to opinion...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—Marketing has always been the voice of the customer--a conduit through which the rest of the company can hear the wishes of its customers. With the Internet, the voice of the customer becomes a shout, says GSB faculty member Ward Hanson. Early online marketing...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—You're trying to catch the digital photography wave. You've set up a hot-looking website, picked features and price points the competition can't beat, and you're attracting lots of customers. Then kaboom! A careless technician hits the wrong key and hundreds of...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—"Less is more" is not an adage you're likely to find in marketing. When it comes to selling goods, conventional wisdom affirms that more is indeed more—offering a greater array of product options increases the likelihood customers will find what they need and...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—Most Broadway plays charge a startling variety of prices for tickets. That person sitting next to you in the back of the orchestra might have paid a premium by ordering over the phone—or stood on line at a discount ticket booth and forked over half of what you...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—In the 1984 film Moscow on the Hudson, Robin Williams plays a Russian musician who impulsively decides to defect during a tour in New York City. A local family takes him in, and to thank them, the young man volunteers to do the grocery shopping—only to pass out...
STANFORD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS—Each week millions of readers look at the New York Times bestseller list to see what everybody else in the country is reading. And as soon as a title hits the list, booksellers typically push the book to the front of the store and slash its price by as much as...

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