Organizational Behavior

Sanofi-Aventis CEO Chris Viehbacher and Genzyme CEO Henri Termeer
Here’s a tip for those who like to predict corporate takeovers: Look for companies where the chief executive is turning 65. Not 63, mind you. And not 67. The magical moment for mergers is specifically the traditional retirement age of 65. A new paper coauthored by Dirk Jenter, associate professor...
employees and managers talking
Sometimes, when a CEO addresses his or her employees, less is more. That’s what Nir Halevy, a Stanford Graduate School of Business professor, found when he and Yair Berson, a professor at Bar-Ilan University in Israel, examined the way in which leaders — whether they are country presidents, chief...
Ajay Banga
After nearly 30 years of experience at global enterprises including Nestlé, PepsiCo, and Citicorp, Ajay Banga landed the top job at MasterCard in 2010. Five years later, MasterCard’s stock has more than tripled to $70 a share, while net income increased from $5.5 billion in 2010 to $8.3 billion in...
Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant
We know dysfunctional conflict when we see it, from boardroom brawls to teams whose members spend so much time in their silos sniping at each other that they get nothing done. But how do conflicts start, and, more mysteriously, how do they infect an entire group on such a grand scale? These are...
Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto
Can introducing controlled chaos into an organization prompt fresh ideas to emerge? Ori Brafman thinks so. For two years, he worked with an organization that thrives on structure and hierarchy: the U.S. Army. His experience in bringing chaos theory into the Army’s decision-making process is...
Amanda North in Bolivia
Sometimes it can take a traumatic event to spur a major change in life. That was the case for Amanda North, who, after graduating from Stanford Graduate School of Business in 1982, went into a career in corporate marketing. She was until recently a marketing executive at a technology firm in...
David Pitt-Watson
Over the span of his career, David Pitt-Watson has played multiple roles: social entrepreneur, politician and financier. He has been a partner at Deloitte, Assistant General Secretary of the United Kingdom’s Labour Party, and Treasurer of Oxfam, Britain’s largest development charity. He is best-...

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