United States

David Pitt-Watson
Over the span of his career, David Pitt-Watson has played multiple roles: social entrepreneur, politician and financier. He has been a partner at Deloitte, Assistant General Secretary of the United Kingdom’s Labour Party, and Treasurer of Oxfam, Britain’s largest development charity. He is best-...
A woman giving a presentation in front of an audience
In my previous post on making memorable presentations, I discussed techniques and practices you can employ to help you remember what you intended to say. However, even perfect preparation can’t guarantee that you won’t forget something. Drawing a blank when you’re standing before an audience can...
Slot machines at MGM Grand Casino
Just a few years ago, Las Vegas gaming giant MGM Resorts International decided that its targeted marketing was, well, off target. Like many customer-facing industries, the gaming and hospitality industry collects massive amounts of data on customers’ behavior and use of promotions. And like other...
Statue of Don Quixote
“We live in a world that emphasizes realistic expectations and clear successes. Quixote had neither,” narrates James March in his 2003 film, Passion and Discipline: Don Quixote’s Lessons for Leadership. “But through failure after failure, he persists in his vision and his commitment. He persists...
Professor Sarah Soule
When she was in graduate school in the early 1990s, Sarah Soule joked with fellow students that it took longer to publish a research paper than to gestate a human baby. From the time a research paper was submitted to a peer-reviewed journal until it was published, a year or more passed. The...
Consumers love a deal, and even more so if it’s customized just for them, right? Not so fast, says Itamar Simonson, a marketing professor at Stanford Graduate School of Business. Simonson has found that rather than being enticed by them, consumers are skeptical of those personalized offers that...
A group of students talking and laughing
Conventional wisdom holds that gossip and social exclusion are always malicious, undermining trust and morale in groups. But that is not always true, according to a new study published in the journal Psychological Science. Robb Willer, an associate professor of sociology, explored the nature of...

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