United States

You know how confident you are when you feel like you look good. A week of regular workouts and an application of the latest age-defying cream, and you're polished enough to take on the world. A hair mishap or a shaving blunder, on the other hand, can make you want to stay hidden behind your...
Amanda North in Bolivia
Sometimes it can take a traumatic event to spur a major change in life. That was the case for Amanda North, who, after graduating from Stanford Graduate School of Business in 1982, went into a career in corporate marketing. She was until recently a marketing executive at a technology firm in...
A couple sitting together on their porch
In the last 30 years, interracial marriage in the United States has more than doubled, from 6.7 percent in 1980 to just over 15 percent in 2010, according to a 2012 Pew Research Center report. Yet given that minorities comprise 37 percent of the U.S. population — and will exceed 50 percent by 2043...
Man turning in his resume at a job fair
If you are promoting someone, advocating for them, or hiring them, you ought to choose someone with a track record, right? How then to explain the rookie phenomenon in sports? A college player gets a huge contract to turn professional, while a top-performing veteran gets a merely large one. The...
Caroline Hu Flexer
Caroline Hu Flexer is the CEO and cofounder of Duck Duck Moose, a 16-person company based in San Mateo, Calif., that makes educational mobile games for children, including apps that let kids drive a fire truck, create an animated comic book, or interact with the infamous “wheels on the bus.”...
A baseball batter, umpire and catcher
We like to think of judges and other arbitrators as unbiased, making decisions based solely on the examination of facts of the case and the rule of law. This is, after all, what they’re charged to do, and spend years training to perfect. But there’s one problem: They’re human. Past behavioral...
A baseball batter hitting the ball
Sports fans, rejoice: You may have been right all along about hot streaks. They aren’t a figment of your imagination. Contradicting academic studies dating back 30 years, researchers at Stanford, Berkeley, and Harvard are now finding that a “hot hand” in basketball or baseball is not a statistical...

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