Paul Yock

PaulYock
Professor of Mechanical Engineering (by courtesy), School of Engineering

Research Statement

Paul Yock’s current research interests include development and testing of catheter-based delivery systems for cardiac cell transplantation and new catheter and molecular imaging techniques for cardiology. He is also involved in the design and early testing of catheter systems to treat coronary and structural heart disease and in new applications of intravascular imaging. He authored the fundamental patents for intravascular ultrasound imaging and conducted the initial clinical trials. Dr. Yock has also authored more than 40 U.S. patents; 300 peer-reviewed publications, chapters, and editorials; and a textbook.

Bio

Paul Yock is the Martha Meier Weiland Professor of Medicine and Co-Chair of Stanford’s Department of Bioengineering with courtesy appointments in the Graduate School of Business and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Dr. Yock began his faculty career as an interventional cardiologist at UC San Francisco and then moved to Stanford in 1994. He served as Acting Chief of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine from 1997-1998. After undergraduate and graduate study at Amherst College and Oxford, respectively, Dr. Yock received his MD from Harvard Medical School, followed by internship and residency training at the University of California, San Francisco, and a fellowship in Cardiology at Stanford University.

He founded the Stanford Center for Research in Cardiovascular Interventions and has trained more than 25 fellows in intravascular ultrasound and interventional cardiology. In 1986 he founded Cardiovascular Imaging Systems, which was acquired by Boston Scientific in 1994.

Dr. Yock directs the Program in Biodesign, a unit of Stanford’s Bio-X initiative, whose mission is to develop leaders in biomedical technology innovation. Twenty-five fellows have completed the Biodesign Innovation Fellowship since 2001.

Teaching

Degree Courses

2018-19

In this two-quarter course series (OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for...

In this two-quarter course series (OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for...

2017-18

In this two-quarter course series (OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for...

In this two-quarter course series (OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams from medicine, business, and engineering work together to identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for...

2016-17

In this two-quarter course series (OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (...

In this two-quarter course series ( OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new medtech products to address them, and plan for their development into patient care. During the first quarter (...

Stanford University Affiliations

Greater Stanford University

  • Co-Chair, Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1994–present