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Accounting Requirements

I. Preparation in Quantitative Methods

All students are required to have, or to obtain in the first year, skill in the use of the following mathematical methods:

Topic Courses
Linear Algebra MATH 113: Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory
Analysis MATH 115: Functions of a Real Variable
Probability MS&E 220: Probabilistic Analysis*
STATS 116: Theory of Probability*
Optimization MS&E 211: Linear and Nonlinear Optimization
Statistics STATS 200: Introduction to Statistical Inference

*MS&E 220 or STATS 116 may be taken concurrently with MGTECON 270 (Econometric Methods I).

Students are expected to have adequate computer programming skills. Knowledge of a computer language such as Fortran, Pascal, or APL is sufficient. If students do not have adequate computer programming skills, they may learn this material on their own or take the Stanford Computer Science course CS106A: Programming Methodology at the latest by the summer following the first academic year at the latest.

II. General Program Requirement (GPR)

All students are encouraged to fulfill the general program requirement during their first year of study. Each course must be passed with a grade of P or B- or better. Interpretation of the LP grade will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

Any changes to the GPR or Field Course Requirement (FCR) will be “grandfathered.” Students are responsible for fulfilling the requirements in place at the time they entered the program.

In rare cases, the director of the PhD Program may waive a general program requirement for a student based on similar PhD-level coursework completed elsewhere. Substitutions as shown below can be arranged through the doctoral liaison, in some cases, for students with prior background in the indicated topic.

Students must take three GPR courses, one course in each of the following three topics: microeconomic analysis, econometrics, and organizations/psychology.

Topic Courses Possible Substitutes
Economics MGTECON 600: Microeconomic Analysis I or
MGTECON 606: Microeconomic Theory for Non-Economist PhDs
MGTECON 601: Microeconomic Analysis II
ECON 203N: Core Economics: Modules 5 and 6 for Non-Economics PhD Students
Econometrics MGTECON 603: Econometric Methods I or
ECON 270: Intermediate Econometrics I
MGTECON 604: Econometric Methods II
MGTECON 605: Econometric Methods III
ECON 271: Intermediate Econometrics II
ECON 272: Intermediate Econometrics III
Organizations/ Psychology

GSBGEN 646: Behavioral Decision Making or

OB 671: Social Psychology of Organizations or

OB 672: Organization and Environment or

OB 676: Social and Political Processes in Organizations or

PSYCH 212: Social Psychology

 

Every student, beginning in year one, will sign up for the required GSBGEN 699: Practicum in Research course for one unit. In terms during which students are doing a teaching practicum, they would sign up for GSBGEN 698: Practicum in Teaching.

Courses
GSB 699: Practicum in Research or
GSB 698: Practicum in Teaching

III. Field Course Requirements (FCR)

Field course requirements must be passed with a grade of P or B- or better. Interpretation of the LP grade will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

Accounting Seminars
ACCT 609: Financial Reporting and Management Control (year 1 or 2)
ACCT 610: Seminar in Empirical Accounting Research (year 1)
ACCT 611: Applications of Information Economics in Management and Accounting (year 1 or 2)
ACCT 612: Financial Reporting Seminar (year 1 or 2)
ACCT 615: Selected Topics in Accounting Research (years 1 and 2)

IV. Breadth Course Requirement

Students must also take one of the following breadth courses by the end of the third year in the program:

Courses
MKTG 644: Quantitative Research in Marketing
STRAMGT 630: Economics of Strategy and Organization
FINANCE 631: Empirical and Behavioral Corporate Finance
GSBGEN 646: Behavioral Decision Making
OIT 670: Applied Dynamic Optimization
POLECON 681: Economic Analysis of Political Institutions
POLECON 682: Testing Models of Governmental Decision-Making

V. Other Course Requirements

In addition to the required courses listed above, students are strongly advised to take additional courses as appropriate for their research orientation. Below are course schedules with additional required courses and recommended courses.

First-Year Students
Autumn Quarter
Required MGTECON 600: Microeconomic Analysis I (GPR) or
 
  MGTECON 606: Microeconomic Theory for non-Economist PhDs (GPR)  plus
MGTECON 603: Econometric Methods 1 (GPR) or
 

ECON 270: Intermediate Econometrics (GPR) 1 plus

MGTECON 640: Quantitative Methods for Empirical Research

Advised STATS 116: Theory of Probability
  STATS 202: Data Analysis
  MS&E 211: Linear and Nonlinear Optimization
Winter Quarter
Required

MGTECON 604: Econometric Methods II or

ECON 271:  Intermediate Econometrics II

Advised MGTECON 601: Microeconomic Analysis II or
ECON 203N: Core Economics: Modules 5 and 6 for Non-Economics PhD Students
   
Spring Quarter
Advised FINANCE 624: Corporate Finance Theory
Advised: Analytical Orientation MGTECON 602: Auctions, Bargaining and Pricing
  MGTECON 608: Multiperson Decision Theory
Advised: Empirical Orientation GSBGEN 640: Multivariate Analysis
  MGTECON 605: Econometric Methods III
  ECON 272: Intermediate Econometrics III
  STATS 218: Introduction to Stochastic Processes
  FINANCE 630: Empirical Corporate Finance
Second-Year Students
Autumn Quarter
Required FINANCE 620: Introduction to Financial Economics
Advised: Analytical Orientation ECON 286: Game Theory and Economic Application
  ECON 257: Industrial Organization I
  MATH 205A: Real Analysis
Advised: Empirical Orientation ECON 273A: Advanced Econometrics I 
  STATS 305: Linear Models
Winter Quarter
Advised: Analytical Orientation ECON 282: Contract Theory
  MGTECON 613: Game Theory
  FINANCE 623: Market Microstructure
Advised: Empirical Orientation ECON 258: Industrial Organization IIa
  STATS 208: Introduction to the Bootstrap
  FINANCE 621: Empirical Issues in Finance
  FINANCE 633: Advanced Empirical Corporate Finance
Spring Quarter
Advised: Analytical Orientation ECON 283: Advanced Topics in Contracts and Organizations
  FINANCE 626: Corporate Finance Theory
Advised: Empirical Orientation MGTECON 609: Applied Econometrics and Economic Research
  ECON 275: Time Series and Simultaneous Equation
  FINANCE 625: Empirical Finance

VI. Summer Courses

Students may take courses during the summer, and should seek their faculty liaison/advisors guidance on this. Possible summer courses include:

Courses
STATS 217: Introduction to Stochastic Processes
STATS 218: Introduction to Stochastic Processes
STATS 207: Introduction to Time Series Analysis
STATS 200: Introduction to Statistical Inference
STATS 203: Introduction to Regression Models and Analysis of Variance
STATS 205: Introduction to Nonparametric Statistics
STATS 206: Applied Multivariate Analysis
MATH 113: Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory
MATH 115: Functions of a Real Variable
MATH 171: Fundamental Concepts of Analysis

VII. Summer Research Paper Requirement

Each student is required to write an original research paper during the summer after the first year of coursework. This research paper is due before the start of the autumn quarter of their second year, and is required to be presented to the faculty during an Accounting Workshop within the first three weeks of the autumn quarter.

Each student is also required to write a second research paper after completing two years of coursework and the area field exam. This second research paper is due at the start of the winter quarter of the third year, and is required to be presented to the faculty during that winter quarter.

Satisfactory completion of this second research paper and presentation is required for admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree. The faculty advisor can give guidelines on the nature of the papers.

VIII. Field Examination

This is a comprehensive written examination on the theory and applications of accounting and its related areas in finance and economics. This examination covers approximately the same subject matter as MBA-level elective accounting courses: ACCT610, ACCT611, ACCT612, and the work presented in the Accounting Workshops (including summer camp).

The examination is usually given in June. It is normally taken at the end of the student’s second year in residence.

IX. Admission to Candidacy

Students who have completed the general program requirement, the field course requirement, the first-year research paper requirement, and the field examination are considered for admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.

X. Dissertation Research

Students are expected to present a seminar on a proposal of possible dissertation topic in the Accounting Workshop in the fall quarter of the third year. A reading committee should be formed and a research design developed in the winter quarter of the third year. A dissertation proposal should be submitted and approved by the student’s faculty advisor by spring of the third year.

XI. Supplementary Requirements

During the first and second years of residence, each student is required to complete a reading course or a research assistantship during each quarter. Normally this activity will be the precursor of the student’s summer research paper.

Each student is expected to participate regularly in the Accounting Workshops organized by the field faculty. Students should be familiar with the institutional material contained in ACCT210, ACCT211 and ACCT311.

There are many other courses taken by PhD students that are offered in departments outside Stanford GSB, such as Computer Science, Economics, Management Science and Engineering, Mathematics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and StatisticsFind descriptions of these course offerings at Stanford’s Explore Courses site.