Lanier Benkard

Lanier   Benkard
Professor, Economics
Contact Info
LanierBenkard
The Gregor G. Peterson Professor of Economics
Graduate School of Business Trust Faculty Fellow for 2016-2017
Academic Area: 
Economics

Additional Administrative Titles

Co-Director, Digital Business: Data, Decisions & Platform Strategy Initiative

Research Statement

Professor Benkard’s research is in the areas of industrial organization, applied microeconomics, and econometrics. His research involves applying microeconomic and game theoretic models to the study of individual markets. His recent work has focused on empirical applications of dynamic oligopoly, and he has recently studied the commercial aircraft and personal computer industries.

Bio

C. Lanier Benkard The Gregor G. Peterson Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he teaches courses in Industrial Organization and Econometrics. Before coming to Stanford in 1998, he received his PhD in Economics from Yale University (1998). He has also been a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (2005-6) and the University of California at Berkeley (2006).

Professor Benkard’s research is in the areas of empirical industrial organization (I.O.), applied microeconomics, and econometrics, and concentrates on applying microeconomic and game theoretic models to the study of individual markets. His recent work has focused on developing methods that allow us to analyze I.O. models empirically. This includes theoretical work on how to estimate demand systems and dynamic oligopoly models, as well as empirical work that uses these techniques to analyze different industries. The recent empirical work includes studies of learning by doing in the commercial aircraft industry, and studies of the demand for personal computers, and of airline mergers

Professor Benkard is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research and is a member of the American Economic Association and the Econometric Society, and has organized conferences for numerous other professional organizations, including the EEA, INFORMS, NBER, SCE, and SITE.

At Stanford, Benkard teaches a course on applied statistics and decision theory in the first year MBA core, as well as PhD courses in Econometrics and Industrial Organization. He also advises PhD students, and several of his former students are now faculty at leading economics departments and business schools.

Academic Degrees

  • PhD in Economics, Yale University, 1998
  • MPhil in Economics, Yale University, 1996
  • MA in Economics, University of Toronto, 1991
  • BSc in Economics & Math, University of Toronto, 1990

Academic Appointments

  • At Stanford since 1998.
  • Professor of Economics, Yale University, 2009-2011

Awards and Honors

  • James & Doris McNamara Faculty Fellow for 2014-2015

Publications

Journal Articles

Lanier Benkard, Przemyslaw Jeziorski, Gabriel Weintraub. The RAND Journal of Economics. October 2015, Vol. 46, Issue 4, Pages 671–708.
Gabriel Weintraub, Lanier Benkard, Ben Van Roy. Journal of Economic Theory. September 2011, Vol. 146, Issue 5, Pages 1965–1994.
Gabriel Weintraub, Lanier Benkard, Benjamin Van Roy. Operations Research. 2010, Vol. 58, Issue 4, Pages 1247–1265.
Gabriel Weintraub, Lanier Benkard, Ben Van Roy. Econometrica. November 2008, Vol. 76, Issue 6, Pages 1375–1411.
Patrick Bajari, Lanier Benkard, Jonathan Levin. Econometrica. September 2007, Vol. 75, Issue 5, Pages 1331–1370.
Lanier Benkard. Review of Economic Studies. 2004, Vol. 71, Issue 3, Pages 581-611.
Lanier Benkard. American Economic Review. 2000, Vol. 90, Issue 4, Pages 1034-1054.

Working Papers

The Long Run Effects of U.S. Airline Mergers
Lanier Benkard, Aaron Bodoh-Creed, John Lazarev, April 2014
Oblivious Equilibrium for Concentrated Industries | PDF
Lanier Benkard, Przemyslaw Jeziorski, Gabriel Weintraub, August 2013

Teaching

Degree Courses

2016-17

This is a short course on data driven decision making. The purpose of the course is to help students become intelligent consumers and producers of data analytics in the business context. Each class meeting will consider a different case/caselet...

This course meets weekly on Tuesdays at Noon. The primary purpose of the course is to read and discuss current working papers in Industrial Organization and related fields (e.g., Econometrics, Marketing, and Labor). Students are required to...

Data and Decisions is a first-year MBA course in statistics and regression analysis. The base D&D lab-based pilot is a new version of the course that combines extensive online materials with a more lab-based classroom approach. Traditional...

2015-16

GSB students are eligible to report on work experience that is relevant to their core studies under the direction of the Director of the PhD Program. Registration for this work must be approved by the Director of the PhD Program and is limited to...

This is a short course on data driven decision making. The purpose of the course is to help students become intelligent consumers and producers of data analytics in the business context. Each class meeting will consider a different case/caselet...

This course will provide an overview of recent advances in, and applications of, dynamic oligopoly models in I.O. We will start by introducing a simple framework for dynamic oligopoly in the context of a dynamic investment model. We will move on...

This course meets weekly on Tuesdays at Noon. The primary purpose of the course is to read and discuss current working papers in Industrial Organization and related fields (e.g., Econometrics, Marketing, and Labor). Students are required to...

This is the base version of D&D. This course introduces the fundamental concepts and techniques for analyzing risk and formulating sound decisions in uncertain environments. Approximately half of the course focuses on probability and its...

Stanford University Affiliations

Service to the Profession

  • Research Associate, NBER, 2009-present
  • Associate Editor, RAND Journal of Economics, 2006-present

Insights by Stanford Business

April 1, 2004
A new study concludes that the losses buyers incur are offset in the larger economy by the gains accrued by sellers.