Faculty Member Mary E. Barth Named a 2017 Outstanding Accounting Educator

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Faculty Member Mary E. Barth Named a 2017 Outstanding Accounting Educator

The award recognizes contributions to accounting education in teaching and research.
November 13, 2017
Mary E Barth | Photo by Nancy Rothstein

Students at Stanford Graduate School of Business have long recognized Mary E. Barth as a gifted teacher: MBA, MSx, and PhD students have conferred on her the Distinguished Teaching Award triple crown, honoring her in 1996, 2017, and 2006, respectively. Now, word has spread beyond Stanford GSB that Barth, the Joan E. Horngren Professor of Accounting, is an outstanding educator.

The American Accounting Association’s Outstanding Accounting Educator Award, which is sponsored by the PricewaterhouseCoopers Foundation, is based on contributions to accounting education from scholarly endeavors in teaching and research over a sustained period of time. Other considerations include educational innovation, excellence in teaching, publications, research guidance to graduate students, and significant involvement in professional and academic societies and activities.

Karen V. Pincus of the University of Arkansas is the other recipient of the 2017 award.

Each award consists of unique glass art pieces, citations, and a $2,500 prize. An additional $2,500 is donated to the AAA in each winner’s name.

Mary E Barth (middle) receives the American Accounting Association’s Outstanding Accounting Educator Award.| Courtesy of AAA
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