Concern for the Ingroup and Opposition to Affirmative Action

Concern for the Ingroup and Opposition to Affirmative Action

By
Brian Lowery, Miguel M. Unzueta, Eric D. Knowles, Phillip Atiba Goff
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
2006, Vol. 90, Issue 6, Pages 961-974

The present experiments suggest that the desire to benefit the in-group drives dominant-group members' policy preferences, independent of concern for out-groups' outcomes. In Experiment 1, the effect of a manipulation of affirmative action procedures on policy support was mediated by how Whites expected the policy to affect fellow Whites, but not by the expected effect on minorities. In Experiments 2 and 3, when focused on losses for the White in-group, Whites' racial identity was negatively related to support for affirmative action. However, when focused on gains for the Black out-group or when participants were told that Whites were not affected by the policy, racial identity did not predict attitudes toward the policy. In Experiments 2 and 3, perceived fairness mediated these effects.