Persuasion, interrupted: The effect of momentary interruptions on message processing and persuasion

Persuasion, interrupted: The effect of momentary interruptions on message processing and persuasion

By
Daniella Kupor, Zakary Tormala
Journal of Consumer Research.
2015, Vol. 42, Pages 300-315

Marketers often seek to minimize or eliminate interruptions when they deliver persuasive messages in an attempt to increase consumers’ attention and processing of those messages. However, in five studies conducted across different experimental contexts and different content domains, the current research reveals that interruptions that temporarily disrupt a persuasive message can increase consumers’ processing of that message. As a result, consumers can be more persuaded by interrupted messages than they would be by the exact same messages delivered uninterrupted. In documenting this effect, the current research departs from past research illuminating the negative effects of interruptions, and delineates the mechanism through which and conditions under which momentary interruptions can promote persuasion.