Marketing Sales

Stanford GSB on YouTube -
June 27, 2014
A marketing professor explains why people share their opinions with others.
A person shopping on the computer.
May 7, 2014
A group of scholars show why what you see isn't always what you get.
February 13, 2014
New research says customized deals often backfire.
Customer with a new iPhone outside of an Apple store
February 4, 2014
The authors of a new book on market research explain how a shift in consumer decision-making affects marketing.
Stanford GSB on YouTube -
January 15, 2014
A film producer explores how to spot trends in the entertainment industry and turn them into blockbuster movies.
Billboards in New York
November 5, 2013
A marketing professor explores what happens when the interests of an advertiser and a consumer aren’t such a perfect match.
A Segway
October 1, 2013
A game-changing idea can win or lose depending on how quickly the consumer “gets” it.
unlabeled arrows pointing all directions
July 23, 2013
Catchy phrases aren’t always the best way to help potential customers make decisions. 
Stanford GSB Professor Jennifer Aaker
July 3, 2013
A Stanford GSB professor of marketing explains why engaging your audience is key to success. 
Elizabeth Blankespoor, assistant professor of accounting, Stanford GSB
April 1, 2013
Research suggests Twitter helps market liquidity of little-known companies.
unlabeled arrows pointing all directions
July 23, 2013
Catchy phrases aren’t always the best way to help potential customers make decisions. 
Stanford GSB Professor Jennifer Aaker
July 3, 2013
A Stanford GSB professor of marketing explains why engaging your audience is key to success. 
JJ Ramberg
November 2, 2012
In a new book, television show host JJ Ramberg shares tips for small business owners and investors.
Beth Cross
November 2, 2012
The founder of boot and apparel maker Ariat International says entrepreneurs should visualize "massive success from day one."
Ellen Siminoff
October 26, 2012
The CEO of Shmoop discusses entrepreneurship, salesmanship, and how to inspire kids to learn.
Jessica Herrin
September 24, 2012
The founder of Stella & Dot discusses leadership, emotional intelligence, and an "angel in a cowboy hat."
photo of faculty and student
July 11, 2012
Award-winning economist Susan Athey, noted econometrician Guido Imbens, corporate finance expert Joshua Rauh, and others to join Stanford GSB faculty.
image of recycling bins
April 20, 2012
A social scientist says the key may be in the messaging. 
Polling place photo
April 17, 2012
How lessons from behavioral science could help increase turnout.
Jennifer Aaker photo
March 26, 2012
GSB Marketing Professor Jennifer Aaker says social media can help  for-profits, nonprofits,  and government organizations  address a deficit of trust in our current culture.
A person shopping on the computer.
May 7, 2014
A group of scholars show why what you see isn't always what you get.
February 13, 2014
New research says customized deals often backfire.
Customer with a new iPhone outside of an Apple store
February 4, 2014
The authors of a new book on market research explain how a shift in consumer decision-making affects marketing.
Billboards in New York
November 5, 2013
A marketing professor explores what happens when the interests of an advertiser and a consumer aren’t such a perfect match.
A Segway
October 1, 2013
A game-changing idea can win or lose depending on how quickly the consumer “gets” it.
Elizabeth Blankespoor, assistant professor of accounting, Stanford GSB
April 1, 2013
Research suggests Twitter helps market liquidity of little-known companies.
March 11, 2013
Can any message be shaped to spread? A scholar offers tips to increase the odds.
sale sign in a store window
February 7, 2013
Research from Stanford's Stephan Seiler says time constraints keep supermarket shoppers from finding best prices.
A shopping cart icon on a keyboard
January 22, 2013
Research shows that too much information about products can be a mixed blessing for buyers and sellers alike.
2012 presidential election ads
October 23, 2012
Research says political candidates might be better off paying for web ads than investing too heavily in TV.