Testing Rape Kits Saves Money and Stops Crime

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Testing Rape Kits Saves Money and Stops Crime

Lawrence M. Wein finds that the benefits of testing outweigh the costs.

About 400,000 sexual assault kits nationwide are sitting untested. Lawrence M. Wein, professor of operations, information & technology at Stanford GSB, says testing them would not only provide closure to victims, but it would also save $81 for every dollar spent by keeping criminals off the street.

Wein Rape Kits

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