Economics

Featured Story

Robert Wilson, left, and Paul Milgrom | Credit: Andrew Brodhead
October 12, 2020
Written

Stanford Economists Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson Win the Nobel in Economic Sciences

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited the pair for improvements to auction theory and inventions of new auction formats.

Featured Story

From left, Robert Wilson, David Kreps, and Paul Migrom, received the 2018 John J. Carty Award in the field of economics. | Elena Zhukova
March 28, 2018
Written

The Future of Economics

Three award-winning economists talk about where the field has been and where it’s heading.

Insights

People line up at a safe social distance outside the grocery store amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. Credit: Reuters/Brian Snyder
September 1, 2020
Written

Mapping the Good and the Bad of Pandemic-Related Restrictions

A new computer model developed by Stanford researchers could help policymakers choose the right reopening strategy.

Insights

Mixed race schoolgirl daydreams while standing in front of a school bus. Credit: iStock/SDI Productions
June 26, 2020
Written

How School Choice Systems Create Unfair Advantages

Lotteries for public school admissions unintentionally favor students who have the option to attend private institutions, a new study shows.

Insights

Locks on the front door of a foreclosed home. Credit: Reuters/Mike Segar
June 30, 2020
Written

Home Foreclosures Can Have Devastating, Long-Term Impacts

A new study finds that the repercussions of home loss extend to crime, divorce, and even student test scores.

Insights

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is seen in the financial district of lower Manhattan during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease in New York City. Credit: Reuters/Andrew Kelly
May 7, 2020
Written

Stanford GSB Scholars Weigh in on Stimulus Package and a Post-COVID-19 Economy

In this panel, professors agreed that something needed to be done, fast, to help the economic fallout, but disagreed on federal government’s strategy.
Insights and faculty research on the interplay between economics, law, and politics, including business-government relations and more.

Insights

Aerial view of people in park. Credit: iStock/Starcevic
August 6, 2020
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How Segregated Are We?

Using GPS data to analyze people’s movements, Stanford researchers found that in most U.S. metropolitan areas, people’s day-to-day experiences are less segregated than traditional measures suggest.

Latest Stories in Economics

November 25, 2020
Written

The Bid Picture: Stanford Economists Explain the Ideas Behind Their Nobel Prize

Robert Wilson and Paul Milgrom show how auctions, if designed correctly, can help distribute resources more fairly.
November 25, 2020
Audio

“You Can’t Have Capitalism Without Capital’’

In this podcast episode, an expert explains the troubled history of Black banking, and how today’s racial wealth gap is rooted in centuries of discrimination.
November 20, 2020
Written

The Research Revolution

Access to superabundant data has transformed the methods of scholastic inquiry — and possibly the basic tenets of inquiry itself.
September 21, 2020
Written

Calculating the Health Benefits of Medicaid Expansion

A controversial arm of the Affordable Care Act reduced strokes, heart disease, and other ailments among older, low-income patients, a new study finds.
September 15, 2020
Written

The Economics of Prioritizing Family Ties in U.S. Immigration Policy

Migrants from overrepresented countries arrive with less education and fewer skills.
September 1, 2020
Written

Mapping the Good and the Bad of Pandemic-Related Restrictions

A new computer model developed by Stanford researchers could help policymakers choose the right reopening strategy.
August 6, 2020
Written

How Segregated Are We?

Using GPS data to analyze people’s movements, Stanford researchers found that in most U.S. metropolitan areas, people’s day-to-day experiences are less segregated than traditional measures suggest.
July 29, 2020
Written

When the Best AI Isn’t Necessarily the Best AI

Why organizations might want to design and train less-than-perfect AI.
June 30, 2020
Written

Home Foreclosures Can Have Devastating, Long-Term Impacts

A new study finds that the repercussions of home loss extend to crime, divorce, and even student test scores.
June 26, 2020
Written

How School Choice Systems Create Unfair Advantages

Lotteries for public school admissions unintentionally favor students who have the option to attend private institutions, a new study shows.