What Does Reward Mean to You?

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What Does Reward Mean to You?

Five Stanford scholars share their insights on the topic of reward.
Illustration of Stanford faculty
Zakary Tormala, Sarah Soule, Francisco Pérez-González, Glenn Carroll and Kristin Laurin | Illustrations by Anje Jager

Five Stanford Graduate School of Business professors recently shared their insights on the the topic of reward.

Which Matters Most: Intentions or Behavior?

How we decide to reward and punish people is often rooted in our religious beliefs, and whether our faith teaches us to focus on a person’s intentions or behaviors.

— Kristin Laurin, assistant professor of organizational behavior

Being Authentic Pays

Consumers value more highly those products they perceive as being genuine as opposed to mass-produced. Such perceived authenticity can also “buffer businesses against negatives” such as questionable cleanliness.

Glenn Carroll, the Laurence W. Lane Professor of Organizations and Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

In Defense of Hedging

Hedging has indirect benefits that can increase a firm’s overall value. A company that hedges against bad weather, for example, becomes more financially aggressive, apparently because it doesn’t have to reserve as much money for unpredictable weather events.

— Francisco Pérez-González, assistant professor of finance

It’s Not What You Did But What You Will Do

Framing your support for a person, a restaurant, or a cause in terms of potential as opposed to achievement could make your case more persuasive.

Zakary Tormala, associate professor of marketing

Shareholder Activism Works

Picketers can hurt a company’s stock price. But less public yet persistent shareholder activism influences companies on social issues, as well.

Sarah Soule, the Morgridge Professor of Organizational Behavior

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