Insights by Stanford Business

Insights

A woman stands in front of shelves of beverages | Reuters/Stephane Mahe
November 9, 2016
Written

Are Consumers Turned Off by Too Many Choices? Not Yet.

A Stanford researcher disputes the theory of “choice overload.”

Insights

A surgeon at work | Reuters/Keith Bedford
November 16, 2016
Written

Why Doctors Can Be Good at Inventing But Bad for Innovation

A study shows why medical startups need top executives who are skilled at turning ideas into products.

Insights

A couple holds hands | Reuters/Chris Wattie
November 22, 2016
Written

How Do Power Couples Make It Work?

Act as a team; focus on small kindnesses; turn on the music and dance.

Insights

Golden State Warriors forward Draymond Green with owner Joe Lacob | Reuters/Bob Donnan-USA TODAY Sports
November 21, 2016
Written

Warriors Owner Joe Lacob: A Relentless Pursuit of Excellence

Lacob explains what it takes to turn around a basketball team — and a business.

Insights

A man standing in the middle of an empty six-lane road | Reuters/Paul Hanna
November 11, 2016
Written

Is Ambivalence Healthy? Researchers Have Mixed Feelings

It can ease the pain when you lose but backfire when you win.

Insights

 A walker is left behind in the empty hallway of an eldercare facility | iStock/Heiko Küverling
November 15, 2016
Written

What’s Behind America’s Elder Care Crisis

Long-term care can be ruinously expensive, and the odds of needing it are high. So why don’t seniors buy insurance to cover it?

Insights

A worker carries a stack of clothes in a garment factory | Reuters/Andrew Biraj
October 31, 2016
Written

How Big Brands Can Cultivate Ethical Suppliers

To ensure that contract manufacturers act responsibly, employ a mix of strategies — and don’t skimp.

Insights

A man walks past the Federal Reserve Bank in Washington, D.C. | Reuters/Kevin Lamarque
November 7, 2016
Written

How Bankers with Political Connections Benefited from TARP

Researchers find connected bankers benefited by trading shares in their banks before government cash infusions.

Insights

A girl uses her phone. | Reuters/Damir Sagolj
October 26, 2016
Written

The Latest Advice for Post-Disaster Therapy: Have Fun

Researchers use phone records to measure the “hedonic behavior” of earthquake victims.

Latest Stories

March 31, 2015
Written

Neil Malhotra: How Politicians Change Their Message to Appeal to Constituents

A Stanford professor of political economy dissects an elemental political instinct.
March 30, 2015
Written

Paul Oyer: Just How Important Is Previous Experience in the Job Hunt?

Larger, more prestigious firms are more likely to take a chance on you.
March 27, 2015
Written

Benoît Monin: Moral Stigma Spreads Down From Top Brass

A CEO’s ethical transgressions can harm the careers of subordinates.
March 27, 2015
Written

David Kreps: Choice, Dynamic Choice, and Behavioral Economics

An economist explains why “rational choice” is sometimes irrational.
March 26, 2015
Written

Negotiating the Big Deal: Cooperation Can Beat Confrontation

A scholar says being ambitious doesn’t necessarily mean being aggressive.
March 24, 2015
Written

Back to the Future: Do Banks Really Learn from Long-Term Relationships?

A pair of economists examine whether banks acquire any special wisdom from repeat borrowers.
March 23, 2015
Written

Walmart CEO: Waiting for Consensus “Can Kill You”

Head of world’s largest company discusses making decisions and knowing when to admit failure.
March 19, 2015
Video

Jeffrey Pfeffer: Power (and How to Get More of It)

A professor of organizational behavior describes how you can increase your influence at work.
March 18, 2015
Written

How a Bit of Play Might Lead to Better Work

The CEO of Badgeville says companies that “gamify” their workplaces could see more engagement and productivity.
March 18, 2015
Written

Renee Bowen: How a Twist to Mandatory Spending Could Reduce Gridlock

A Stanford economist shows how warring political parties could get better results by building some flexibility into mandatory spending programs.