Frances & Arjay Miller Prize in Social Innovation

The Frances and Arjay Miller Prize is awarded to future leaders in social innovation and alleviates some of the financial hardship associated with choosing a social-impact career path.

The prize is granted to one or more Public Management and Social Innovation Certificate holder(s) each year. The recipients are individuals committed to tackling social or environmental challenges and building a more just, sustainable, and prosperous world in the next chapters of their careers.

Eligibility

  • Second year MBAs and Sloan Fellows graduating in fall quarter 2019 or the winter, spring, or summer quarters of 2020 and who are on track to earn a Certificate in Public Management and Social Innovation.
  • Students committed to focus on social impact in the next phase of their careers, regardless of sector. As of the 2018-2019 academic year, students launching their own ventures are no longer eligible to apply for the Prize. Proof of employment or relevant activity is required after graduation.
  • Students must be eligible for financial aid in accordance with Stanford GSB’s financial aid criteria.
  • Winning the FAM Prize excludes students from competing for the Social Innovation Fellowship or receiving the Henry Ford II Scholar award.

Stipend

Prize winners receive a stipend of $20,000 each.

Expectations

Prize winners are expected to seek employment focused on addressing a social or environmental challenge. Prize money may be recalled absent compliance with expectations.

Selection Criteria

  • Alignment of career plans with social and environmental public impact
  • Strong coursework focus on social innovation
  • Outstanding contributions to the Stanford social innovation community

The Prize Winners

arjay fellows
Professor & Dean Emeritus

Arjay Miller, the school’s fourth dean, who described himself as “just an old bookkeeper,” led Stanford Graduate School of Business into the top ranks of management education institutions, expanded its endowment, and created the often-copied Public Management Program.