The MBA Class of 2019

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The MBA Class of 2019

Learn about our newest 417 MBA students, by the numbers.
October 10, 2017
Members of the MBA Class of 2019 gather inside of Jack McDonald Hall.

In September, Stanford Graduate School of Business welcomed to campus 417 new MBA students from across the globe.

The members of the MBA Class of 2019 are remarkably diverse, hailing from 61 countries and speaking 60 languages; in all, 41% are international students. U.S. minorities make up 29% of the class, and 40% of the class members are women.

As with past cohorts, the Class of 2019 is academically strong. Fifteen percent of the members come to Stanford GSB with previous advanced degrees. The average GMAT score is 737, and the average undergraduate GPA for U.S. schools is 3.73. Students represent 164 undergraduate institutions, a 14% increase over last year’s level.

The students in the Class of 2019 have extraordinary potential.
Kirsten Moss

The Class of 2019’s employment background is just as varied. Students come from 301 organizations, with investment management/private equity/venture capital, consulting, and technology making up the top three industry categories. Government/education/nonprofit jobs come next, and consumer products and services rounds out the top five.

“The students in the Class of 2019 have extraordinary potential, and over the next two years will support each other as they develop their career focus, business knowledge, and leadership skills,” says Kirsten Moss, assistant dean and director of MBA admissions and financial aid.

Stanford GSB’s MBA Program received 8,173 applications for the incoming class, a new record. Because the candidate pool is ever-changing, the statistics for entering students change each year, too. What remains constant: Stanford GSB students’ commitment to becoming leaders who will transform their industries and communities.

— Victoria Hendel De La O

2019 MBA class

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