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The U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise in Washington March 1, 2013. The best government programs are flexible yet predictable. | Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
March 18, 2015
Written

Renee Bowen: How a Twist to Mandatory Spending Could Reduce Gridlock

A Stanford economist shows how warring political parties could get better results by building some flexibility into mandatory spending programs.

Insights

People release paper lanterns  in the river
February 5, 2015
Written

Hiroshima Governor’s Goal: End the Nuclear Threat

How Hidehiko Yuzaki plans to convince the world to abolish nuclear weapons.

Insights

A man wearing protective gear in a decontamination site
October 16, 2014
Written

Lawrence Wein: Five Disaster Scenarios — and What We Learn From Them

A professor tackles the most effective responses to some of the world’s most dangerous risks.

Insights

A man looking at newspaper headlines hanging on a window
February 3, 2015
Written

Keith Krehbiel: Why the Cost of Vote-Buying Favors Moderate Policies

A Stanford political economist predicts that the new Republican Congress won’t overcome the “gravitational pull to the center” in U.S. politics.

Insights

Man with an umbrella walking in front of the Capital
January 12, 2015
Written

Cheer Up, Americans! Gridlock and Bureaucrats Actually Improve Our Politics

A Stanford professor of political economy finds virtue in filibusters and “unelected bureaucrats.”

Insights

Little girl holding an American flag
January 5, 2015
Written

Jens Hainmueller: What Drives Anti-Immigration Attitudes?

A scholar says natives are worried more about their cultural identity than their jobs.

Latest Stories in Public Sector

March 31, 2015
Written

Neil Malhotra: How Politicians Change Their Message to Appeal to Constituents

A Stanford professor of political economy dissects an elemental political instinct.
March 18, 2015
Written

Renee Bowen: How a Twist to Mandatory Spending Could Reduce Gridlock

A Stanford economist shows how warring political parties could get better results by building some flexibility into mandatory spending programs.
March 17, 2015
Written

Neil Malhotra: Debunking the Myth of the Liberal Supreme Court

A political economist looks at the relationship between public opinion and the high court.
March 11, 2015
Written

Renee Bowen: How Voters Can Beat Special Interest Groups

More protests and political competition help, but surprisingly, so does elected officials' salaries.
February 26, 2015
Written

Lisa De Simone: How U.S. Companies Export Profits to Save on Taxes

A Stanford scholar examines three methods of income shifting, and why some firms benefit more than others.
February 5, 2015
Written

Hiroshima Governor’s Goal: End the Nuclear Threat

How Hidehiko Yuzaki plans to convince the world to abolish nuclear weapons.
February 3, 2015
Written

Keith Krehbiel: Why the Cost of Vote-Buying Favors Moderate Policies

A Stanford political economist predicts that the new Republican Congress won’t overcome the “gravitational pull to the center” in U.S. politics.
January 12, 2015
Written

Cheer Up, Americans! Gridlock and Bureaucrats Actually Improve Our Politics

A Stanford professor of political economy finds virtue in filibusters and “unelected bureaucrats.”
January 5, 2015
Written

Jens Hainmueller: What Drives Anti-Immigration Attitudes?

A scholar says natives are worried more about their cultural identity than their jobs.
October 20, 2014
Written

Eric Bettinger: Why Stay-at-Home Parents are Good for Older Children

Parental presence isn’t just for infants and toddlers.