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Insights by Stanford Business

Insights

Customers at a bank | Reuters/Paul Hackett
March 24, 2015
Written

Back to the Future: Do Banks Really Learn from Long-term Relationships?

A pair of economists examine whether banks acquire any special wisdom from repeat borrowers.

Insights

Planning, Presenting, Practice
March 2, 2015
Written

Matt Abrahams: Tips and Techniques for More Confident and Compelling Presentations

A Stanford lecturer explains key ways you can better plan, practice, and present your next talk.

Insights

A trader plays a computer game in the trading room of the Shanghai Petroleum Exchange. | Reuters/Aly Song
March 18, 2015
Written

How a Bit of Play Might Lead to Better Work

The CEO of Badgeville says companies that “gamify” their workplaces could see more engagement and productivity.

Insights

Jeffrey Pfeffer
March 19, 2015
Video

Jeffrey Pfeffer: Power (and How to Get More of It)

A professor of organizational behavior describes how you can increase your influence at work.

Insights

The U.S. Capitol building is seen at sunrise in Washington March 1, 2013. The best government programs are flexible yet predictable. | Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
March 18, 2015
Written

Renee Bowen: How a Twist to Mandatory Spending Could Reduce Gridlock

A Stanford economist shows how warring political parties could get better results by building some flexibility into mandatory spending programs.

Insights

Reuters/Jonathan Ernst
March 17, 2015
Written

Neil Malhotra: Debunking the Myth of the Liberal Supreme Court

A political economist looks at the relationship between public opinion and the high court.

Insights

Walmart CEO Doug McMillon | Natalie White
March 23, 2015
Written

Walmart CEO: Waiting for Consensus “Can Kill You”

Head of world’s largest company discusses making decisions and knowing when to admit failure.

Insights

A woman walking out of Google
February 26, 2015
Written

Lisa De Simone: How U.S. Companies Export Profits to Save on Taxes

A Stanford scholar examines three methods of income shifting, and why some firms benefit more than others.

Insights

A man holding his hands over his face
February 23, 2015
Written

Why Your Workplace Might Be Killing You

Stanford scholars identify 10 work stressors that are destroying your health.

Latest Stories

October 23, 2014
Written

Charles O’Reilly: Finding a Corporate Culture that Drives Growth

Adaptive cultures minimize predictability and encourage innovation.
October 20, 2014
Written

Eric Bettinger: Why Stay-at-Home Parents are Good for Older Children

Parental presence isn’t just for infants and toddlers.
October 17, 2014
Written

What Would it Really Cost to Reduce Carbon Emissions?

Not as much as you might think, according to two scholars.
October 16, 2014
Written

Lawrence Wein: Five Disaster Scenarios — and What We Learn From Them

A professor tackles the most effective responses to some of the world’s most dangerous risks.
October 15, 2014
Written

Roadside MBA: Big Lessons From America’s Small Businesses

Three economists hit the road to learn about America’s small businesses. Here’s what they discovered.
October 14, 2014
Written

Szu-chi Huang: Pursuit of a Mutual Goal Can Turn Friends into Foes

Marketing research finds that peer support in programs such as Weight Watchers fades as members near the target.
October 10, 2014
Written

Nicholas Bloom: What Leads to Economic Uncertainty?

An economist explains how political polarization and government growth have increased uncertainty.
October 9, 2014
The New Republic
In a piece for the New Republic, Stanford scholar-in-residence Jeffrey Ball says the two-degree goal — cutting carbon emissions to prevent a two-degree annual increase in the earth's average temperature — is unrealistic and counterproductive.
October 9, 2014
Written

Kristin Laurin: Do People’s Connections with God Mimic Their Human Relationships?

A scholar finds similarities between interpersonal connections and relationships to a higher power.
October 7, 2014
Written

An Entrepreneur and His Wife Row 2,800 Miles Across the Pacific

For a cofounder of Trulia, a seemingly hazardous adventure was good for mind, body, and business.