Our Top Teaching Takeaways of 2022

Articles, videos, and podcasts that capture great teaching and memorable lessons.

December 06, 2022

| by Jenny Luna
Colorful illustration of three people walking through a dark and slightly ominous doorway surrounded by large intertwining pillars. Credit: Illustration by Dalbert Vilarino

Over the past year, Stanford GSB students tackled real-world problems and ventured into virtual reality.| Illustration by Dalbert Vilarino

If you’re a lifelong learner, we can help you expand your curriculum. Through series like Back to Class, Podcases, and Class Takeaways, we share ideas and research coming out of Stanford Graduate School of Business — lessons that help shape tomorrow’s leaders. Here’s some of our most memorable classroom content from the past year.

Meta Moment

Leaders can learn important lessons from adopting an “improviser’s mindset,” say lecturer Dan Klein. His students recently got a unique chance to practice their improv skills during a two-hour class held entirely in virtual reality.

Our Best Shot

This podcast based on a Stanford GSB case study dives into development of COVID-19 vaccines and the practical and ethical questions raised by this unprecedented effort.

Data-Driven Decisions

The first step in using data is understanding what it can and cannot do. In his class People Analytics, associate professor Amir Goldberg teaches how to utilize data analytics and prediction models to make better decisions.

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